Former Stonewall chief executive Ruth Hunt to join the House of Lords

10 Sep 2019 News

Ruth Hunt, who was until recently the chief executive of Stonewall, has been made a crossbench life peer in Theresa May’s parting honours list.

The prime minister’s resignation honours are granted by the Queen at the request of an outgoing prime minister. These honours and peerages follow the resignation of Theresa May.

Hunt was the chief executive of Stonewall until August 2019. She was appointed in August 2014, having worked in senior positions in the organisation since 2011. 

Stonewall is a charity which advocates for equality and human rights for LGBT people. Hunt saw the organisation through a significant growth period, with staff numbers increasing from 75 to 160, and income growing from £5.38m to £8.69m. 

Stonewall: 'An inspirational and dedicated leader who transformed Stonewall’s culture'

Jan Gooding, chair of Stonewall said: "We’re delighted Ruth Hunt has been granted a peerage. She’s an inspirational and dedicated leader who transformed Stonewall’s culture, including integrating trans communities into our work and forming a unique partnership with The Rainbow Project in Northern Ireland. I know that her collaborative and intelligent approach will add huge value in the House of Lords.

"Ruth’s fourteen years at the charity has been marked by extraordinary progress in our mission to build acceptance for LGBT people, much of which she is responsible for. We are incredibly grateful for all the work Ruth has done to make the world better for lesbian, gay, bi and trans people. From all of us here at Stonewall: Congratulations Ruth!"

Prior to Stonewall, Hunt worked at the Equality Challenge Unit where she led work advising higher education institutions on sexual orientation and gender identity equality.

In 2015, Hunt was voted the third most influential LGBT person in Britain in the Independent’s Rainbow List. She received two honorary degrees in 2015, one from Cardiff University and the other from Keele University.

The list of peerages sees those appointed sit in the House of Lords. It includes Cressida Dick, the Metropolitan police commissioner, who is to become a dame and Lady Justice Hallett, vice-president of the court of appeal criminal division, who becomes a life peer.

Sir Simon Woolley, the founder of operation Black Vote, a campaigning group that seeks to inspire BME communities to engage with our public institutions was also made crossbench life peer.

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