Dot NGO domain set for 2014 launch

05 Sep 2013 News

The Public Interest Registry’s application to manage a new generic top-level domain, .ngo, has passed the initial evaluation stage, and the body has now announced that it is building a Facebook-style hub for organisations to connect with each other.

The Public Interest Registry’s application to manage a new generic top-level domain, .ngo, has passed the initial evaluation stage, and the body has now announced that it is building a Facebook-style hub for organisations to connect with each other.

The Public Interest Registry (PIR) which already manages the .org suffix, applied for .ngo (and .ong – the equivalent acronym in several Latin-rooted European languages) when the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names Numbers (Icann) launched its generic top-level domain name programme last year.

It is now slated for a public launch in late 2014 or early 2015 and PIR has set about building a platform that organisations using the extension will be able to use to connect with each other.

Brian Cute, chief executive of PIR, said: “We are now focusing our attention on the development of a new directory that will allow NGOs and ONGs around the world to find each other and share information, and connect with donors, volunteers, and potential partners on an entirely new level.

“Think of it like a Facebook for NGOs; with your very own .ngo/.ong domains you will automatically be entered into the directory, thereby granting you access to an abundance of new opportunities.”

Charities, and other non-governmental organisations, can continue to register their interest in obtaining the new domain once it is available.

Contest for dot charity

Both of the private companies that applied for the .charity suffix have also passed the initial evaluation stage, despite concerns from the sector.

Following their initial applications they both submitted further supporting documents during the evaluation process.

Icann’s applicant guide recommends that organisations should decide between themselves which should be awarded the suffix. If they can't, the applicants will be invited to a community priority evaluation stage and asked to fill out a questionnaire. Each application will then be evaluated and scored by a panel to decide who manages the new domain.

As a last resort Icann will hold an auction to determine who should run .charity.

 

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