Sir Thomas Hughes-Hallett

Sir Thomas Hughes-Hallett

Thomas Hughes-Hallett is chair of Cause4 since August 2013.

He was chief executive of Marie Curie Cancer Care from 2000 to 2012. In April 2012 he became a trustee for the King's Fund.

Educated at Eton College and Oxford University (where he gained an MA in modern history) Tom, as he is known, went on to qualify as a barrister. From there he spent 22 years in the banking profession working as chief executive of Enskilda Corporate, chairman of Robert Fleming Securities, and later, director of Fleming Asset Management.  

In December 2010 he was announced as chair of the new independent Philanthropy Review, a collaboration of voluntary and private sector bodies who aim to identify ways of achieving a step-change in charitable giving in the UK. He is also a member of the Kings Fund General Advisory Council, chairman of the End of Life Care Implementation Advisory Board, review chair for the Palliative Care Funding Review for adults and children in England and a trustee of Esmee Fairbairn Foundation.

Tom has formerly been chairman of English Churches Housing Group and the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, a director of the National Council for Palliative Care and a special trustee of Great Ormond Street Hospital.

He was knighted in the Queen's Birthday Honours List 2012.

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