Maeve Sherlock

Maeve Sherlock

Since October 2006, Maeve Sherlock has been a full-time postgraduate student at Durham University.  Until then, she was chief executive of the Refugee Council.  Before that, she spent three years as a special adviser to Gordon Brown when he was Chancellor of the Exchequer, where her brief included child poverty, welfare reform and the voluntary sector.
Before moving to the Treasury, Maeve was chief executive of the National Council for One Parent Families and, prior to that, director of UKCOSA, a charity focusing on overseas students and international education. She is a former President of the National Union of Students and a commissioner on the Equality and Human Rights Commission

Sherlock is currently chairing an advisory panel which is advising ministers on the future role of the third sector in economic and social regeneration. She is also a member of the Carnegie Commission of Inquiry into the Future of Civil Society and a trustee of the independent think-tank, Demos.

 

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Maeve Sherlock

Maeve Sherlock, a former chair of the Charity Awards judging panel, is to be part of the government panel set up to talk to communities affected by the riots in August.

Civil society manifesto to launch

The Commission of Inquiry into the Future of Civil Society in the UK and Ireland will launch its manifesto Making Good Society next month.

Baroness Maeve Sherlock

The Electoral Commission has launched its guidance for non-party campaigners on managing spending and donations, as Labour appoints Baroness Maeve Sherlock to review the Lobbying Act, which it has pledged to repeal.

Sherlock homes in

Ian Allsop talks to the refugee Council's chief executive, Maeve Sherlock .

We need you!

Fundraising Codes of Practice have never been as important as they are today, which is why it's essential fundraisers participate in the consultation on the new code for direct mail, says Megan Pacey.

VAT on property and land

On 1 August 1989, HMRC enabled businesses — and that included many UK-based charities, particularly the larger ones — to decide whether to charge VAT on the supply of property and land, which in turn meant the VAT incurred on related costs could be recovered.

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