Lindsay Boswell

Lindsay Boswell

Lindsay Boswell is chief executive of Big Lottery Fund programme the Fare Share Trust which aims to build stronger communities. He joined the Trust after ten years as chief executive of the Institute of Fundraising from 2000 to 2010.

Prior to joining the Institute Boswell worked with Raleigh International as director of operations and, before that, as country director for Chile, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Malaysia.

Previously, Boswell was London director for the Prince’s Trust Volunteers.

 

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Caroline Beaumont, Clore Social Fellow

Charities could unlock untapped resources if they were more strategic about non-cash giving, says Caroline Beaumont.

Amanda McLean

Staring out at the Cornish coast, Amanda McLean decided she was the right person to lead the Institute of Fundraising. Celina Ribeiro catches up with her before she gets her feet under the desk to find out a bit more about the new chief executive.

Institute appoints Amanda McLean as CEO

Amanda McLean has been appointed to take over from Lindsay Boswell as chief executive of the Institute of Fundraising.

Who will fill Lindsay Boswell's shoes?

Tania Mason wonders what kind of leader the Institute of Fundraising needs next.

Lindsay Boswell leaves Institute

After a decade in post, Institute of Fundraising chief executive Lindsay Boswell will leave the organisation to take up a new chief executive role at a charity.

And the winner is...

Not many things will silence a room hundreds-deep with half-drunk fundraisers, but Lindsay Boswell taking to the podium and announcing "we made a mistake tonight is one of them, says Celina Ribeiro.

Academics should research donors, not marketing, conference hears

Leaders in fundraising academia defended themselves against criticism that their research was inaccessible and irrelevant, in a heated panel discussion last week.

Time to invest in talent!

The sector is failing to grow its own fundraising leaders, says Lindsay Boswell. It’s time for charities to start investing in talent and stop being frightened of promoting people.

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