Andrew Chaggar

Andrew Chaggar

Executive director, International Disaster Volunteers from 2008

Andy Chaggar co-founded International Disaster Volunteers (IDV) in 2008.

He originally qualified as an Electronic Engineer and worked for five years as a semiconductor designer in Munich, Germany.  However, in 2004 he was seriously injured and bereaved in the South-East Asian tsunami.

Following his recovery he began his journey as a disaster response volunteer. Before founding IDV he managed house reconstruction in Thailand, obtained a Masters degree in International Development and implemented sanitation projects in Peru.

In 2010 he was named a winner of the Vodafone Foundation’s World of Difference International Programme which enabled him to manage IDV’s operations in Haiti. In 2012 he was named as a winner of the Vodafone Foundation’s Grahame Maher award which allowed him to launch IDV’s second deployment of volunteers in the Philippines.

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Reflections on ending an international development project

International Disaster Volunteers' operations are ending in Manila. Andrew Chagger explains how the organisation developed an exit strategy to ensure its work's sustainability.

Ka Noli using Frontline SMS

International Disaster Volunteers deployed a free, open source computer programme to warn people of typhoons in the Philippines. By Andy Chaggar.



European disaster volunteers work with local partners in the Philippines

Andrew Chaggar is on a journey of discovery and growth as he turns his attention to building a sustainable governance structure in his disaster relief charity. He shares his latest lessons about the limitations of law.

Finding funding for projects that reduce disaster risk

Securing funding for disaster risk reduction work can be tricky. Andrew Chaggar suggests ways to drum up support preventative works.

Manila skyline

Preventing disasters in the first place is obviously preferable to providing relief afterwards, says Andrew Chaggar, but convincing people locally is no easy task.

The wake of the Haiti disaster where European Disaster Volunteers were instrumental in support. Image credit: Marcello Casal Jr

Attracting funding can be a challenge in prevention projects, given people don't notice what doesn't happen. But prevention must be better than cure, says Andy Chaggar.

Back to the frontline

Andrew Chaggar rounds up his governance-heavy year away from the frontline of disaster recovery, and divulges his latest adventure ahead.

Let's be realistic about measuring impact

How do you measure impact when there's so little consensus over how to do it or what the results should be? Andrew Chaggar offers his take on measuring sustainability.

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