John Tate

John Tate

Accountant and entrepreneur

John Tate is a qualified accountant and entrepreneur. He is a columnist for Charity Finance, a visiting lecturer at Cass Business School's Centre for Charity Effectiveness and Trustee of Eduserv. He also non executive chair of Civil Society Media.

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Fake Charities? Bogg's Blub? Intelligent Giving?

 Here are a few sample websites that claim/attempt to reveal much about the inner workings of the sector....

Transparency and the web

John Tate says the web is a real danger to charities’ reputations.

Time to Twitter?

Technology is meant to improve efficiency, says John Tate. I gave a couple of talks last month to finance directors in the commercial sector on the future of IT. In my sessions I asked two questions. Firstly, how many of you work for organisations where the senior management con-sistently replies to staff emails? Of the 100 or so delegates only 2 or 3 put their hands up.

Cold comforts

How can IT help in a recession, wonders John Tate.

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Social Charity Spy: Charities’ online response to the Nepal Earthquake

1 May 2015

The Disasters Emergency Committee, ActionAid and Save the Children have been making full use of social...

Technology lessons from down the ages

1 May 2015

Holiday technology frustrations remind John Tate of some important IT rules.

Social Charity Spy: Anne Frank Trust UK with #notsilent and Shelter plays political bingo

17 Apr 2015

This week we highlight the Anne Frank Trust UK’s use of social video to commemorate the 70th anniversary...

Going beyond the Sorp

1 May 2015

Andrew Hind has some advice for charities in the process of writing their annual reports.

Star gazing in the charity sector

1 May 2015

Ian Allsop ponders the meaning of rising stars, fading stars and no stars.

Technology lessons from down the ages

1 May 2015

Holiday technology frustrations remind John Tate of some important IT rules.