Avoiding HR slip-ups: the top ten people management mistakes made by charities
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Avoiding HR slip-ups: the top ten people management mistakes made by charities

25 Jul 2016

Helen Giles depicts her ten top ways that charities set themselves on a course for disaster in managing their staff.

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Avoiding HR slip-ups: the top ten people management mistakes made by charities

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Andrew Hind

In this regular column, Andrew Hind answers readers’ queries about governance issues. This month, a finance director asks for advice on how to get the board more involved with compiling annual accounts.

Taking the long view

Imagine you were setting your investment strategy from a standing start. Peter Baxter of Trust for London goes through the process.

Helen Baker

Trustees need to make sure they are being given the right information, says Helen Baker.

Orlando Fraser, image credit Alex Griffiths

Orlando Fraser, Charity Commission board member, tells Kirsty Weakley that the regulator is committed to the independence of the sector.

Good advice, but there is an important point to add: merger is rarely a proper answer to impending insolvency.

» Trustees ignoring looming insolvency

Tom Rutherford

The 2015 Climate Change Conference of Parties (COP21) put global warming firmly onto the political agenda and made it important for all charities to think about carbon in their investment portfolios, says Tom Rutherford.

Antonia Swinson

Is your charity property savvy? Antonia Swinson highlights some key points for trustees to consider.

Lindsay Driscoll

A new trustee seeks advice from Lindsay Driscoll on a board's over-reliance on paid advisers.

Governance cartoon

Liz Hazell highlights a charity with an outdated governance structure and how it managed to turn things around. 

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Anne-Marie Piper (5) Tania Mason (4) Dorothy Dalton (4) Anne Moynihan (4) Don Bawtree (3) Neal Green (3) Beryl Hobson (3) Karen Brown (3) Kirsty Weakley (3) Ian Gould (3) Less +++ More +++

A new benchmark: performance monitoring without the WM Charity Index

18 Jul 2016

With the demise of the WM Charity Index, charity trustees must re-address performance monitoring, says...

What now for charity property investors?

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Having written about the outlook for property investors in Charity Finance prior to the EU referendum,...

What do charities need to know about the new government?

14 Jul 2016

Kirsty Weakley looks at who’s in the new Cabinet so far, and what charities need to know about it.

The pros and cons of RNLI's move to opt-in communications

18 Jul 2016

RNLI was the first major charity to announce it would move to ‘opt-in’ communications. Giving supporters...

Mark Goldring: Traditional fundraising techniques are not dead, but they're not growing either

15 Jul 2016

Chief executive of Oxfam Mark Goldring, winner of this year’s Daniel Phelan Award for Outstanding Achievement...

How to prevent your fundraisers from burning out

14 Jul 2016

Fundraising has never been tougher, and burnout can be a real problem. Fundraisers are only human after...

Social media - how to make sure you comply with employment law

4 Mar 2016

Gearalt Fahy, partner at 3volution, examines some of the challenges for employers created by the rise...

Four ways that innovation can be the solution for charities

1 Mar 2016

Based on his experiences at Relate, Chris Sherwood suggests four ways to innovate your way out of a difficult...

Business intelligence solutions for charities

3 Feb 2016

Businesses and charities are increasingly adopting business intelligence solutions. Gareth Jones investigates...

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