Andrew  Hind CB

Andrew Hind CB

Chair, Fundraising Standards Board

Andrew has been a leading figure in civil society for 25 years.

He was the first chief executive of the Charity Commission from 2004 until September 2010, and is widely credited with ensuring the sector has a regulator that is fit for purpose.

He became guest-editor of Charity Finance for the February and March 2011 editions before taking up the role on a permanent basis until the end of 2015, when he left to become chair of the Fundraising Standards Board.

In early 2011 he also took up a part-time role as Visiting Professor of Charity Governance and Finance at Cass Business School.

He was awarded the prestigious Companion of the Order of the Bath in the New Year's Honours List 2011.

Andrew’s other current roles include serving as a non-executive board member of the Council for Healthcare Regulatory Excellence, and he was also a non-executive member of the board advising the Information Commissioner.  He is a member of the NCVO Advisory Council which meets four times a year.

Andrew became a trustee of the Baring Foundation in October 2010.  He also sat on Lord Hodgson’s taskforce making recommendations to government about cutting red-tape in the voluntary sector. 

Andrew has extensive experience of working with the charity sector. He was a senior executive with ActionAid (1986-1991) and Barnardo's (1992-1995) before moving to the BBC in 1995, where he was chief operating officer of BBC World Service. 

Hind was co-founder in 1988 of the Charity Finance Directors' Group (CFDG), and its chair from 1992-1994. He is the author of The Governance and Management of Charities, and was chair of the Charity Awards judging panel in 2011, having also served as a judge in the early years of the Awards. He received the Outstanding Achievement Award for longstanding commitment and service to the voluntary sector at the Charity Awards 2008.


 

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Andrew Purkis

Andrew Purkis examines a future funding model for the Charity Commission.

Andrew Hind

The regulator has come under fire within the sector for being heavy-handed over its treatment of the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust, but Andrew Hind says much of the criticism is unfounded.

Dark days for the Commission

The Charity Commission's handling of the Cup Trust case was inadequate, according to its former chief executive Andrew Hind.

Tribunal fails public benefit test

Former Charity Commission chief executive Andrew Hind offers his verdict on the recent public benefit Tribunal judgment.

Whatever the motivation behind the idea that charities be required to publish their expenditure on campaigning and political work in their annual returns, I don't think we should reject it too quickly. While such a requirement should not become burdensome for charities, any move towards greater transparency and accountability, in our sector as in others, is a positive one.

» Public benefit test - to be, or not to be?

Charities have further to go on equal opportunities for women

While charities appear to be steamrollering ahead of the private sector on women in the boardroom, all is not as favourable as it seems. Andrew Hind comments on where the sector is failing.

Charity Commission update - September 2005

It's a time of change for the Commission. We have a new chair, Geraldine Peacock, and chief executive, Andrew Hind.

Displaying 1 to 6 (of 6)

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