Dove Trust charities will be paid a third of what they are owed
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Dove Trust charities will be paid a third of what they are owed

23 Jul 2014 | Jenna Pudelek

The charities and good causes owed money by the Dove Trust, owner of the suspended fundraising website CharityGiving, are due to start receiving payments in September, after a High Court ruling on how the charity must pay out the funds owed.

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Dove Trust charities will be paid a third of what they are owed

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In memory
Opinion

In memory

6 Oct 2009
Tags: Legacies

Someone very close to me died about six months ago. Because she received care from a particular organisation and because I wanted to do something positive at a dark time, I did what lots of her friends and relatives did, I chose to make a donation to a charity in her name. I did this online and told them clearly the reason for my gift (they gave me a neat little drop down box to help me do so).

Bmycharity scraps all fees and charges

Bmycharity has scrapped all fees and commission charges on its fundraising pages, making online sponsorship entirely free to charities. On the day that the ballot opens for next year’s London Marathon, for which Virgin Money Giving will be the official affiliate sponsorship site, Bmycharity has announced that from midnight last night it will not charge anything to process sponsorship donations to charities

Beware the fervour of your devoted fans

Australia's most beloved spread turned to its fans in a textbook case of online democracy to create a name for a new product. The spectacular failure of the experiment is a warning to all those who put too much faith in the genius of crowds.

High Risk or Low Risk - you choose

This morning I needed to drop off an application to the UK Identity and Passport Service. However I had the temerity to arrive at the bewildering set of doors (customer exit, customer entrance and "staff only") holding not just a completed passport application in the correct envelope, but also my dog. I should explain that Ben is not a Rottweiler nor an Alsatian, or any other form of "attack dog". Ben is in fact a rather daft, presently rather woolly, Cocker Spaniel. In fact he resembles a black and grey teddy bear with ridiculous long ears and, happily, a full and woolly tail. I had hoped I might walk through the correct door, step three feet up to the reception desk, hand an envelope to the reception staff and leave. Would that life was so simple!

Spot on Lucy, if a charity doesn't have a clear ambition, its absence will infect every fundraising ask they make. And that's daft.

» What would your charity do with a social fundraising windfall?

Negative sector stories outweigh positive by eight to one

Newspaper coverage of philanthropy and the recession between September last year and April this year contained eight pessimistic portrayals of a ‘vulnerable’ sector for every one article that depicted the sector as robust and resilient, a study shows. The inherent danger in this is that such stories can affect confidence in giving and create self-fulfilling prophecies of a giving recession, the researchers suggest.

Great North Run breaks record

The 2009 Great North Run has already raised more than one and a half times as much as last year. The run, which is the world’s largest half-marathon, attracted 29 per cent more participants than in 2008, but has already raised 55 per cent more donations than the 2008 event.

School's out on public benefit: Charity 250 Index October 2009

Income growth at schools moves Charity 250 Index higher, explains Gareth Jones.

Why the word 'leverage' has no place in charity comms

Think about the way you're talking to your supporters, and the language you use. It makes the difference between being listened to and ignored.

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