Share

Ministers face 'firing squad' at Giving Summit

Admiralty House
News

Ministers face 'firing squad' at Giving Summit 2

Fundraising | Celina Ribeiro | 9 May 2012

Ministers attending last night’s Giving Summit faced a room of sector representatives united and angry in their opposition to the tax relief cap.

Last night, minister for civil society Nick Hurd and Treasury Secretary David Gauke faced a room of about 40 sector leaders and philanthropists who were reportedly unanimous in their opposition to the proposal, in the March Budget, to cap the tax relief on donations made by higher-rate taxpayers to 25 per cent of income or £50,000.

Mark Astarita, chair of the Institute of Fundraising, said that the ministers appeared responsive in front of the vocal crowd at Admiralty House (pictured) in Whitehall.

“Hats off to them, they sat there and David in particular took it on the chin,” he said.  “They’ve heard, they’ve listened and they’ve taken it on the chin. They’ve taken a bit of a pounding really. In all fairness to them, I thought they gave an excellent account of themselves.

“It wasn’t far short of a firing squad really.”

Astarita added that the government was to be applauded “because the one thing they’ve managed to do – which no one has ever managed to achieve yet – is to get all these disparate organisations in a room, who usually fight like ferrets in a bag, to all agree that they all disagree with [this proposal]”.

Peter Lewis, chief executive of the Institute, characterised the drinks reception atmosphere as “robust”.

“David Gauke is absolutely committed to the tax system being seen to be fair, for him that means high net worth individuals paying tax,” he said.

Ben Kernighan, deputy CEO of NCVO, added that the ministers were "left absolutely certain that this is one campaign that is not going to go away".

Civilsociety.co.uk understands that some attendees at the Giving Summit session put forward the idea of increasing the tax relief cap to 50 per cent of income – the rate at which it is set in the United States – or allowing higher-rate taxpayers to ‘roll over’ their donations into different financial years.

Steve Moore, of Big Society Network, reportedly suggested that the government draw a line under the row over the tax relief cap and instead bring together a group to discuss funding of the sector more generally.

A consultation about the cap is due to be held over the summer. Gauke assured attendees it would not drag on until Christmas, saying there would be resolution by September. At the moment, the proposal is due to be included in the Finance Bill.

Task group suggestions to take forward

Lewis said the Institute was pleased with some of the suggestions made by the task groups which fed into the Giving Summit meetings. In particular, the legacy group is keen to work with government on nudging people to make legacies at different points in their lives. He said the group also supported a proposal to create an online hub which would bring together in one place all the different platforms for giving so charities could easily compare them.

“We’ll be talking to officials over the next few weeks to see how it progresses,” Lewis said.

In a briefing before the summit yesterday, Hurd said that the government plans to release a new paper, reviewing its progress but also making announcements based on the ideas put forward by the task group chairs at the Giving Summit.

Kevin Russell
Technical Director
Stewardship
9 May 2012

I presume, Paul, you mean the centuries' old principle that a taxpayer should not pay tax on income foregone where it has been given to charity, for the public benefit.

I wholeheartedly agree that this principle should be preserved, over and above any mantra that everyone should pay a minimum rate of tax including on that income foregone.

Mr Paul Gibson
National Charity Specialist
Mazars LLP
9 May 2012

I agree with David Gauke that our tax system needs to be seen to be fair. There's a debate to be had. To me, it's simplistic to say that high net worth individuals should pay tax and there should be a cap on philanthropy.

There's a principle at stake here and we should preserve it. I hope there isn't a fudge such as a 50% cap, to get the Government off its own hook.

Comments

[Cancel] | Reply to:

Close »

Community Standards

The civilsociety.co.uk community and comments board is intended as a platform for informed and civilised debate.

We hope to encourage a broad range of views, however, there are standards that we expect commentators to uphold. We reserve the right to delete or amend any comments that do not adhere to these standards.

We welcome:

  • Robust but respectful debate
  • Strongly held opinions
  • Intelligent relevant discussion
  • The sharing of relevant experiences
  • New participants

We will not publish:

  • Rude, threatening, offensive, obscene or abusive language, or links to such material
  • Links to commercial organisations or spam postings. The comments board is not an advertising platform
  • The posting of contact details for yourself or others
  • Comments intended for malicious purpose or mindless abuse
  • Comments purporting to be from another person or organisation under false pretences
  • Gratuitous criticism, commentary or self-promotion
  • Any material which breaches copyright or privacy laws, or could be considered libellous
  • The use of the comments board for the pursuit or extension of personal disputes

Be aware:

  • Views expressed on the comments board are left at users’ discretion and are in no way views held or supported by Civil Society Media
  • Comments left by others may not be accurate, do not rely on them as fact
  • You may be misunderstood - sarcasm and humour can easily be taken out of context, try to be clear

Please:

  • Enjoy the opportunity to express your opinion and respect the right of others to express theirs
  • Confine your remarks to issues rather than personalities

Together we can keep our community a polite, respectful and intelligent platform for discussion.

Free eNews

Homelessness charity unveils fundraising app that helps the charity locate rough sleepers

31 Mar 2015

A London-based homelessness charity has launched an app that uses geolocation technology to let people...

Charity Tax Group calls for further postponement of 20 per cent tax on direct mail fundraising

31 Mar 2015

The Charity Tax Group and the Direct Marketing Association have jointly called on the government to again...

Save the Children and RB launch programme to reduce child deaths from diarrhoea

30 Mar 2015

Save the Children and health and hygiene company RB have launched a programme as part of their ongoing...

Election campaigning rules take effect for purdah

1 Apr 2015

Now that Parliament has been dissolved ahead of the general election on 7 May, all charities must make...

CCNI closes investigation into governance concerns at animal charity

1 Apr 2015

The Charity Commission for Northern Ireland has closed a statutory inquiry which investigated concerns...

Tate Britain director to step down

1 Apr 2015

Penelope Curtis is stepping down from her role as director of Tate Britain in order to become the first...

Homelessness charity unveils fundraising app that helps the charity locate rough sleepers

31 Mar 2015

A London-based homelessness charity has launched an app that uses geolocation technology to let people...

Social media 'slacktivism' encourages people to donate, finds JustGiving report

18 Mar 2015

People who share a fundraising page on social media are four times more likely to donate than those who...

Samaritans closes Twitter monitoring app permanently

11 Mar 2015

Samaritans has confirmed that it has permanently closed its app that was designed to monitor people’s...

Join the discussion

 Twitter button

@CSFinance