Martin  Brookes

Martin Brookes

Director, Paul Hamlyn Foundation from 10 June 2013

Martin Brookes was appointed director of the Paul Hamlyn Foundation in June 2013.

He was formerly the chief executive of New Philanthropy Capital.

A former Bank of England (1987 – 1993) and Goldman Sachs economist (1994 – 2001), he joined NPC as an analyst, became director of research in 2003 and then chief executive in March 2008.

Brookes is chair and co-founder of Pro Bono Economics, which provides other charities with free economic expertise to help them better understand the environment in which they operate.

 

Photo credit: Matt Clayton/PHF

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