John  Low

John Low

Dr John Low is the Charity Aid Foundation’s chief executive. He was chief executive of RNID from 2002 to 2007 and led the development of government-funded low-cost hearing aids that allowed access to the devices for thousands of deaf people. Prior to this he was RNID’s director of research and technology and had career in the technology industry.

As CAF chief executive he has overseen the establishment of an informal working group that brings the Treasury into CAF dealings over the issue of lifetime legacies, as well as a wholescale restructuring of the organisation.

Low was chair of Acevo for five years until 2009 and is an independent member of the House of Lords Appointments Commission established by Tony Blair. He has been a  Charity Awards judge for several years. 

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