From tax cap to U-turn - how it all happened

From tax cap to U-turn - how it all happened

From tax cap to U-turn - how it all happened

Finance | Kirsty Weakley | 1 Jun 2012

Yesterday the sector celebrated as George Osborne announced the proposed cap on tax relief for large donations would be scrapped. charts the progress of the sector's campaign.

Since the Budget announcement when Chancellor George Osborne revealed  that tax relief on donations would be capped at the higher of £50,000 or a quarter of the donor's income, the sector has been campaigning against the measure. Almost 3,500 organisations and individuals signed up to the the GiveItBackGeorge campaign. 

Here's how the story evolved: 


[<a href="" target="_blank">View the story "Charity tax relief cap" on Storify</a>]


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Kirsty Weakley

Kirsty Weakley is a reporter at Civil Society Media.

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